1.   Design for local materials. High quality materials and construction. (‘First’ State House, Fife Lane, Mirimar, Wellington, 1937)

 

2.   If buildings are built of a good standard, on going cost will be less. (‘First’ State House, Fife Lane, Mirimar, Wellington, 1937)

 

3.   Efficiency on planning and design reduce to reduce wasted cost. (‘First’ State House, Fife Lane, Mirimar, Wellington, 1937)

 

4.    Social mix and variety. (‘First’ State House, Fife Lane, Mirimar, Wellington, 1937)

 

5.   Government prejudice against modern design. (‘First’ State House, Fife Lane, Mirimar, Wellington, 1937)

 

6.   The elements as windows are repeated through all the house designs to reduce cost through mass production. Variety is in non premanufactured elements (the decoration). (‘First State House in Christchurch, 51 Windsor St., 1937) (State House, Barrington Street, Christchurch, 1941)

 

7.   Solid and void. (Multiunit proposal for Dept. of Housing, New Zealand, 1939) (Werkbund Housing, Vienna, 1930-32)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

8.   When using a renowned building as the inspiration, the inspiration is always a better building. (Symonds Street Block, Auckland, 1945-47) (Pavillon Suisse, Cité Univerisitarire, Paris, 1930-31)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

9.  If a culture only has one monumental building type to use as an icon, reinterpretations are limited in visual creation of forms. Must look beyond the traditional forms and to the culture and their values. (Laurelie Place Housing, Wiri, 1987)

 

10. Integration of indigenous culture with international and western traditional. Maori, post war modern, Gothic. (Futuna Chapel, Wellington, 1961)

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